Mosquito Abatement

Mosquito Abatement

     Montgomery County uses a number of techniques and methods to control the mosquito population in our area. Mosquitoes can not be totally removed from our environment, but their impact on our community has been greatly reduced by the safe and effective program used by Montgomery County.

     The truck-mounted ULV (Ultra Low Volume) Fogger is the method in use that is most often noticed by the public. A very small amount of chemical insecticide is dispersed into the air by the fogger at a specific rate and volume proven to be harmless to humans, pets and livestock, with the exception of an extremely small number of people that are highly sensitive or allergic.

     Even so, it is always a good idea for everyone to keep their exposure to pesticides at a minimum. That can be done by keeping clear of the fogger and staying out of the treated area for an hour after the fog clears or dries out. Wash exposed skin with water. Those rare few that experience sensitivity or allergic reactions should seek medical assistance immediately.

     Each individual is their own first line of defense in personal protection from mosquitoes. Eliminate unnecessary standing water; do not allow stagnant water to accumulate; stay inside during dawn, dusk, and early evening when possible, wear clothing that covers your arms and legs when you go outside; use EPA-approved mosquito repellent; and, report neglected or abandoned sites of stagnant water to your County Commissioner’s office.

The Zika Virus

     The Zika virus is not expected to become wide spread in Texas, but there will be more cases than have been reported thus far. A few facts that might help in planning a course of action regarding the spread of the Zika virus are:

  • Not all mosquitoes bite humans, not all that bite carry disease, and not all that carry disease have the Zika virus.
  • Zika infection causes only a mild reaction in most people, but reaction can be severe in some cases.
  • The first case of locally acquired (not travel related) infection in Texas was reported at Brownsville in November of 2016.
  • The Zika virus, along with a number of other diseases, is carried and transmitted (vectored) by mosquitoes commonly found in this area.
  • Humans can vector Zika through sexual contact.
  • Mosquito management programs are already in operation to control vector mosquitoes.

   Spring, summer, and fall are important times to do everything possible to avoid infectious bites. A few ways to avoid infection from vector mosquitoes are:

  • Eliminate unnecessary standing water in open containers, toys, old tires, etc., and keep water fresh in birdbaths, pet bowls, water troughs, etc. Do not allow stagnant water to accumulate.
  • When possible, stay inside during dawn, dusk, and early evening. Vector mosquitoes are most active at these times.
  • Wear clothing that covers your arms and legs when you go outside; especially during dawn, dusk, and early evening.
  • Use EPA-approved mosquito repellent.
  • Report neglected or abandoned sites of stagnant water to your County Commissioner’s office.

     It is important for each individual to realize that they are their own first line of defense in personal protection from mosquitoes.